Gustav Kvikant simmar i havet.

Arcada alumnus swims 500 kilometres for the Baltic Sea

Published: 31.05.2022 / Alumni

In the first week of June, Gustav Kvikant starts swimming from Stockholm with the goal of reaching Helsinki about a month later. The Arcada alumnus is on a mission to raise awareness of the many problems the Baltic Sea faces and will be the first ever to swim this distance.

Kvikant has studied physiotherapy at Arcada and graduated in 2020. Physical activity has always been an important part of his life and now he saw an opportunity to combine this with another cause that is close to his heart - climate issues and especially the health of the Baltic Sea.

– We can’t take it for granted that we always will be able to swim in the Baltic Sea. We have to work for a clean and prosperous sea. Today, we talk more than ever about climate-related issues. This is good, but I think it is important not only to talk but also to act. This is my way of doing something and raising these issues, says Kvikant.

Both physical and logistical preparations

Gustav Kvikant står på en strand.

This is the longest staged individual swim performed in the Baltic Sea, which means that Kvikant has spent a lot of time on planning and preparations this spring. This has involved everything from finding a good team and sponsors to thinking about how the route should be set up and what food is needed on the trip. In early June, the sailboat with his team will start from Stockholm. The goal is to swim an average of 15 kilometres per day, which means approximately 4-7 hours of swimming divided into two legs.

– As a physiotherapy alumnus, I am used to physical performance and have an inner drive to challenge myself. But at the same time, I have respect for both my body and the sea. The plan is to swim every day, but of course there are external circumstances I can't control, like the weather or possible injuries.

The unusually cold spring has created some challenges as the water temperature has not risen as desired. Although Kvikant has equipment adapted for swimming in cold water, he wants the water to be at least 12 degrees. He estimates that it will take about 4–6 weeks to swim from Stockholm to Helsinki.

– When I first got this idea, I dismissed it, thinking there's a reason why no one has done this before. But now I've landed in a calmness and confidence that I will be able to do this, he says.

Raising money for a clean sea

During the swimming, Kvikant will collect donations to the Baltic Sea via the John Nurminen Foundation External link. All the money goes directly to preserving the sea for future generations.

– It has been an ambitious project and my wish is of course that people want to support it, but it is just as important to raise awareness and discussion. I hope that as many as possible will join me on this journey and participate in the work to save the Baltic Sea.

You can follow Gustav Kvikant's journey across the Baltic Sea via The Baltic swim 2022 External link, on Instagram @balticswim2022 and Facebook External link in Arcada's channels during June.

Arcada alumnus swims 500 kilometres for the Baltic Sea

Gustav Kvikant simmar i havet.

In the first week of June, Gustav Kvikant starts swimming from Stockholm with the goal of reaching Helsinki about a month later. The Arcada alumnus is on a mission to raise awareness of the many problems the Baltic Sea faces and will be the first ever to swim this distance.

Category: Alumni